How to get to the Hollywood Sign. Best route to the Hollywood sign.
The world's smallest cinema to Hollywood

How to get to the Hollywood Sign.

The only and best route to the Hollywood Sign

We were in Hollywood for some meetings about the world’s smallest cinema. It was a nice day, so we decided to walk to the back of the Hollywood Sign. Many routes have been closed down, but this one is still open and it will remain open. The hike was awesome and the view as well.

There used to be a short hike towards the sign, but there have been traffic complaints from people in the neighbourhood so the path has been closed. Luckily, we have found a good alternative route. It takes a bit longer, but it is worth the walk. You can even take a short detour to the former Batcave from the old Batman films and series.

Navigate to 2798 Canyon Drive, Los Angeles, California. It is named ‘the batcave trail’. Drive as far as you can. You can park your car at the toilets. It is a hike, so these are the last toilets that you will encounter.

route to Hollywood sign

This is where the hike starts

Start walking straight ahead on the non-paved road. When you encounter your first split keep to your right. Follow the trail up the hill. At a certain point you will see a sign that says “you made it”. Take a left.

route or path to Hollywood sign

Take a left here to get to the Hollywood sign

First you will walk downhill, before you will go uphill again. You will also look down on a horses ranch. You can see a road that is fenced off above you. That is where you will be walking later. Keep going uphill.

How to get to the Hollywood Sign

You will pass this at some point. Just keep walking to get to the Hollywood sign.

After a while you will descent a little bit and continue on a paved road. Go uphill again. Follow the track and the rest will explain itself. When you walk steadily up and down will take at least 90 minutes. It is worth it!

How to get to the Hollywood Sign. Best route to the Hollywood sign.

When you made it to the Hollywood Sign. This is what you will get. It is awesome.

Also follow: www.facebook.com/cinemapiccolo.nl

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The world's smallest cinema to Hollywood

The world’s smallest cinema at the Oscars

I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo was invited to the event for the directors of the Oscar® Nominated Shorts

Now that the dust has settled, it is time to reflect on our Oscar adventure. I knew that I wanted to finish my adventure around the date of the Oscars when I started it. Little did I know that I would actually be invited to one of its special events. I had already been meeting up with Carter Pilcher, the CEO of Shorts International, in the Netherlands during the Dutch Film Festival, and twice in Santa Monica. Shorts Internationals had the intention to make the world’s smallest cinema part of the Shorts Awards, a special Oscar event for the directors of the Oscar® Nominated Shorts. However, it was not yet certain if it was actually possible. A few weeks before the event I got the green light. What a joy!

The week before the event I dropped by their office to discuss the details. I was not aware yet that I actually was allowed to screen the Oscar® Nominated Shorts which was very exciting news. The list with nominations is quite long and I prefer to screen shorts with a maximum length of five minutes, so I made a selection. I screened “Get a Horse!” by Lauren MacMullan and Dorothy McKim, “Mr. Hublot” by Laurent Witz and Alexandre Espigares, “Pitääkö Mun Kaikki Hoitaa? (Do I Have to Take Care of Everything?)” by Selma Vilhunen and Kirsikka Saari, “Feral” byDaniel Sousa and Dan Golden, and “The Voorman Problem” by Mark Gill and Baldwin Li. The exciting part was that all the directors would be there too. Also, I was informed that a celebrity would receive a special award during the event.

Five days before the event I received a phone call by FunX Radio. They caught up on the story and wanted to interview us. We discovered that AT5 published a story about my presence during the Oscar weekend and that other media, including several blogs and news websites, followed up on it. The Filmkrant, the most established film magazine of the Netherlands, interviewed me and published a story, Radio 2 interviewed me live on national radio, and the Metro, one of the largest Dutch newspapers, published the story in their print edition.

The event was held on the Saturday evening of the Oscars weekend at the Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills, a one-minute walk from the most prestigious shopping street of LA, Rodeo Drive. In the meanwhile, Monica Cho and Jennie Chow travelled all the way from San Francisco to help me with the event and with PR, their speciality. After months of drought, the Oscar weekend started with the heaviest downpours since 2011. The city was being taken over by flash floods. Luckily, the cinema had a central position inside the building. The event was wonderful and glamorous. The responses to the cinema were overwhelming. Above all, the enthusiasm and positive words by the Disney crew made my night. Marieke Oudejans (film and television producer from the Netherlands) accepted an International Visionary Award for Eye International, and Rutger Hauer (on of my favorite actors) accepted an International Visionary Award by the Dutch Film Fund. It was a truly amazing weekend!

Shorts Awards - Oscars - I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

Shorts Awards – Oscars – I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

Shorts Awards - Oscars - I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

Shorts Awards – Oscars – I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo – Metro

Shorts Awards - Oscars - I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

Shorts Awards – Oscars – I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

Shorts Awards - Oscars - I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo - Batman

Shorts Awards – Oscars – I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo – Batman

Shorts International - Shorts Awards - I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

Shorts International – Shorts Awards – I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

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The world's smallest cinema to Hollywood

Film critic Rene Mioch visits I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo in Hollywood

We have film critic Rene Mioch as a special guest in the world’s smallest cinema

There is only one Dutch film reporter that is a celebrity himself among the stars of Hollywood. When Rene Mioch covers an item on the red carpet, stars ranging from Oprah Winfrey, Robert Redford and Nicole Kidman will recognize him and come over for a little chitchat. He is our Dutch insider not only in Hollywood, but also in the rest of the world. (He has only missed one Cannes Film Festival since he began going before the age of twenty!)

As we know, winters in Hollywood are crammed with film events meaning Rene spends a considerable amount of winters in Southern California. We cannot blame him, as the winters here have a tendency to be nicer than those of Amsterdam.

This year we invited him over for dinner and a number of film screenings. Because we strive to show Hollywood the quality of the shorts we screen, we decided to organize this private screening for him with hopes he would give us a true film critics opinion. While the home cooked dinner was on the stove and in the oven, we took a break in world’s smallest cinema. He proved to be a genuine film buff—as he was eager to see a more than a few shorts. He enjoyed every single one of them and thought that they were all very different from one another. His opinion was that the filmography of the Common Denominator by Tess Löwenhardt was superb. Overall, he enjoyed ‘Life’s Too Short Not to Be Frank’ by Tom Huntingford the most—saying it was surprising and unique. As we shared many stories about film, the evening grew to be extremely pleasant. With great anticipation, we hope we will have the honor of hosting more wonderful guests like Rene in the future.

Rene Mioch, 's werelds kleinste bioscoop, Hollywood

Rene Mioch bezoekt in Hollywood ’s werelds kleinste bioscoop.

world's smallest cinema, Rene Mioch, Hollywood

Rene Mioch and Maarten van der Weijden with the world’s smallest cinema

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The world's smallest cinema to Hollywood

I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo at Oddball Films

We are invited to a screening night at Oddball Films in the Mission, San Francisco.

The world’s smallest cinema’s search for events in San Francisco has been very exciting and fruitful. The most remarkable find was Oddball Films. A true hidden gem, Oddball Films is surprisingly tucked away on the third story of a building on a small street in the Mission. Oddball Films is the film component of Oddball Film+Video, a stock footage company providing offbeat and unusual film footage for feature films like Milk, documentaries like The Summer of Love, television programs like Mythbusters, clips for Boing Boing, and web projects around the world.

Their films are almost exclusively drawn from their collection of over 50,000 16mm prints of animation, commercials, educationals, feature films, movie trailers, medical, industrial military, news out-takes and every genre in between.

Oddball Films actively works to present rarely screened genres of cinema as well as avant-garde and ethno-cultural documentaries, which expand the boundaries of cinema. Every week, Stephen Parr and his programmer, Kat Shuchter, put together two offerings of offbeat cinema. On Thursday or Friday evening you can sit between stacks of film tins and watch some truly unique film.

That type of eclectic and unique film offering is definitely something the world’s smallest cinema is working to be part of. Fortunately for Cinema Piccolo, Stephen and Cat enjoy having us there as well. We discovered this after an adventurous first run on a Friday night. Street parking can be somewhat of a hassle in the Mission on a Friday night, but we decide to give it a try anyway. Needless to say, all the parking spots are taken. After a good wait, we manage to get a parking spot in front of the door. We cannot get the cinema up the stairs, so we decide boldly to put it on the pavement.

I start building up and Cat is fixing the electricity. Stephen throws the extension cord down from three stories and, unfortunately, Cat catches it with her head. Ouch! The show must go on, and I manage to get the cinema running. We start fifteen minutes late, but we screen continuously. The responses are overwhelmingly positive.

After watching ‘Nachtblind’ by Nena van Driel, Stephen Parr comments “A surprise birthday party gone wrong- a clever short for I Vitelloni viewers.”

Oddball Films is the largest film archive in Northern California and one of the most unusual private collections in the US. If you find yourself in Northern California, do not miss out on seeing this hidden gem.

Oddball Films

Kat Shuchter preparing film at Oddball Films

The world's smallest cinema and Oddball Films

Kat Shuchter, Oddball Films, in the world’s smallest cinema

Oddball Films, I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

Maarten van der Weijden and Stephen Parr in front of the world’s smallest cinema

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The world's smallest cinema to Hollywood

The world’s smallest cinema at the Francis Ford Coppola winery

We are invited at the Francis Ford Coppola winery and we are certainly excited

Splendid! We have received a great invitation for the day. We have to wake up early to drive all the way to Napa Valley. The Francis Ford Coppola Winery invites us for a tour and tasting on the premises. Obviously, we do not have to think twice.

The landscape itself is amazing on the way there. The Napa Valley region reminds me of Tuscany. Once we arrive we do not know where to look. There are movie props everywhere and the winery looks beautiful. I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo obviously blends in perfectly. We receive a warm welcome and are taken on a stroll.

Francis Ford Coppola has been producing wine for years. He does not only excel in producing films, as the wine venture has been growing enormously as well. First, we get a tour around the premises, which is pretty impressive. Coppola tried to involve as many references to film as possible. At the estates we were fortunate to see the car from Tucker: the man and his dream, the desk and fresco from the Godfather, the boats from Marie-Antoinette and many other items.

Afterwards, we get a tasting. It is only noon, so we have to take it easy on the wine. We get to taste many wines but one stands out. This is the 2011 Cinema from the Director’s cut label. The wine itself is exquisite, but the label and name are also interesting. Coppola has named his studio after one of the first ways to watch a moving image, the Zoetrope. We get to see an actual Zoetrope. You can place a kind of paper ribbon with drawings inside the Zoetrope. Once you spin it you can see the drawings transform into a moving image. The label of the wine carries the ribbon and refers to the Zoetrope.

On the way back to San Francisco we missed our exit, because cars would keep pulling up besides us to take pictures of the cinema. In a way that is funny, but not when it keeps on happening and we are seriously delayed.

Francis Ford Coppola, the world's smallest cinema, I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo at the Coppola winery

Francis Ford Coppola winery, the world's smallest cinema, I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo and the Godfather fresco at the Francis Ford Coppola Winery

Francis Ford Coppola, the world's smallest cinema, I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo travelled to the Francis Ford Coppola winery

Dracula, Francis Ford Coppola, the world's smallest cinema, I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo and Dracula items at the Francis Ford Coppola Winery

Coppola, The Godfather, I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo, the world's smallest cinema

The world’s smallest cinema at the Coppola winery

Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, the world's smallest cinema, I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo

The world’s smallest cinema on the Golden Gate Bridge

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The world's smallest cinema to Hollywood

I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo at the San Francisco Chronicle building

We are invited by the Impact Hub for their Holiday Block Party at the San Francisco Chronicle building.

A day after our bad luck at the Another Hole In The Head Film Festival, we get a second chance. The Impact Hub Bay Area in San Francisco invites us for a Holiday Bloc Party in the old San Francisco Chronicle building. They host the sold-out event together with the San Francisco School of Digital Film Making, Indiegogo, Yahoo, Intersection, TechShop, 5M and many others. San Francisco is a world centre for technology and new ways of working, and this event is yet another example.

The San Francisco Chronicle building is located just around the corner of Union Square. We leave early to counter possible challenges caused by the heavy traffic. In the event, we do encounter a challenge but it’s not the traffic. The only door that enables us to drive the cinema inside does not open. Quite problematic given that we have already unstrapped the cinema with all but one cable on a busy road.

Luckily, there is an inner courtyard where Off the Grid is hosting a Food Truck market especially for the event. We wanted to get in touch with them before, because they are happening in San Francisco. They organise several events weekly and enable a lot of food trucks to cook on a daily basis. The options vary from Japanese hamburgers and Korean sandwiches to gourmet crème brûlée.

As it’s just around the corner, we decide to drive there with the cinema strapped with just one cable. The traffic is heavy and there are seven fire trucks around the corner, so we don’t want to waste time. With hindsight, this is not the safest bet. The cinema almost rolls off the pick-up truck, which would be pretty messy in a city like San Francisco with its steep roads. Luckily, we discover it just in time to hold it back. Once we set up the cinema it becomes clear that it’s a perfect match with Off the Grid.

The party starts to bustle and the line for the cinema is growing. Our film Nachtblind does not have any subtitles, but that does not matter to most people. They love it. Two women even make up their own English lines for the film, which is pretty hilarious as everyone can hear their laughter from the outside. Nachtblind by Nena van Driel is the most successful film of the night. Overall it’s a great night, and we are feeling confident about all the events that are yet to come.

the world's smallest cinema

The world’s smallest cinema at the Impact Hub Block party at the San Francisco Chronicle building.

the world's smallest cinema

I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo at the Block Party at the San Francisco Chronicle building

the world's smallest cinema

I Vitelloni: cinema piccolo at the Block Party at the San Francisco Chronicle building

#theworldsmallestcinema

The world’s smallest cinema at the San Francisco Chronicle Building

the world's smallest cinema

world’s smallest cinema at the San Francisco Chronicle building

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The world's smallest cinema to Hollywood

The world’s smallest cinema is going to Hollywood!

The news is out. The last couple of months we have been working hard to make something special happen. From the start we knew that the world’s smallest cinema belongs in Hollywood. We encountered some challenges, but we are pleased to announce that the cinema is on its way by ship and will arrive in California soon. We will travel between San Francisco and Los Angeles to visit a number of people and places with a special connection to film. We are very excited and are looking forward to this adventure. We hope to discover great things about the past and future of film. Please spread the word and follow our Facebook Page, Instagram and Twitter for regular updates!

World smallest cinema in Hollywood

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